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East Midlands Branch Butterfly Conservation

Black Hairstreak Satyrium pruni

Habitat

The Black Hairstreak is a very localised butterfly occurring in only a small number of colonies across the south and east Midlands generally, and is recorded at only one site in Leicestershire within the three counties which make up the East Midlands Region of Butterfly Conservation. It favours dense stands of mature Blackthorn in sheltered, sunny locations along woodland edges. In common with other hairstreaks it spends much of its time high in the canopy of large trees, but will come down to nectar on bramble flowers and Wild Privet.

Identification

Both sexes are similar, and can be easily confused with the White-letter Hairstreak. The main distinguishing feature is the row of black and white tapering spots above the orange band on the underside of the hindwings, and the white 'W' is less pronounced.

Flight times

The flight period is very short between mid-June and early July.

Food plants

Black Hairstreak - © Christine Maughan cut out picture of purple-hairstreak butterfly

Distribution Maps for the East Midlands Region

No Data

No Data

No Data

Black Hairstreak distribution map 2013
2013 Summary
No of tetrads 1
First sighting 08/07/2013
Last sighting 08/07/2013

No Data

Black Hairstreak distribution map 2015
2013 Summary
No of tetrads 1
First sighting 20/06/2015
Last sighting 20/06/2015
Black Hairstreak distribution map 2005-09

Combined records for the five year period 2005-09

Black Hairstreak distribution map 2010-14

Combined records for the five year period 2010-14

No Data

 

Photo Gallery

Black Hairstreak

Black Hairstreak © Christine Maughan

Black Hairstreak

Black Hairstreak © Christine Maughan

Black Hairstreak Black Hairstreak
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Similar or Easily Confused Species and ID Hints

White-letter Hairstreak Satyrium w-album

The main distinguishing feature is the row of black and white tapering spots above the orange band on the underside of the hindwings, and the white 'W' is less pronounced.

A worn Green Hairstreak lacking most of its green colouration
White-letter Hairstreak - © Simon Jenkins
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